Perfect floral bath bomb recipe and why I don't buy them anymore

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Perfect floral bath bomb recipe and why I don't buy them anymore

Once upon a time I was very pregnant with my son, and my husband returned home from the mall with some bath bombs for me. I'd heard of them before, but had never given them a try. It was such a sweet gesture, and I really enjoyed the experience. I spent the rest of my pregnancy taking leisurely baths and stocking up on these fun and fragrant splurge.

 

Fast forward a few years, I now live overseas - I've been blogging and researching our household products for some time. We had already paid close attention to our food ingredients, and I have gotten rid of everything with artificial fragrance, harmful unsustainable chemicals. But, there's one place I never thought to look...

 

My lush products. 

Lush had done such a phenomenal job marketing their product that I assumed their products all claimed to be “handmade”, “fresh”, “natural”.

I actually can't believe I'm writing this post because I genuinely loved that store. I always asked for their products for holidays and my birthday. When we traveled to a country that had a lush, I would need an extra suit case and spend hundreds of dollars buying my "self care" products. And now, I can no longer find any products on their site I would actually want to use.

Here's an example of a common bath bomb I probably once used. I no longer enjoy bathing in a glittery, artificial scented and colored bath. It does not feel like self care. 

 

Sodium Bicarbonate ,Citric Acid ,Popping Candy (Isomalt, Lycasin, Carbon Dioxide),Fragrance,Cream of Tartar (Potassium Bitartrate) ,Water (Aqua) ,Peppermint Oil(Mentha piperita) ,Grapefruit Oil (Citrus paradisi) ,Vetivert Oil (Vetiveria zizanoides) ,Cedarwood Oil (Juniperus Virginiana) ,Sodium Laureth Sulfate ,Lauryl Betaine ,Titanium Dioxide ,Synthetic Fluorphlogopite ,Tin Oxide (Tin oxide) ,Silica ,*Limonene ,*Linalool ,Yellow 10 Lake ,Yellow 5 Lake ,Blue 1 ,Red 28 ,Iron Oxides .

 

If you thought the food industry was bad about being misleading with their marketing and ingredients, the cosmetic industry is worse. Here are some of the ingredients that broke my heart when I saw them in my lush products.

Fragrance 

Fragrance is a "trade secret" loophole that allows companies to skip disclosing harmful ingredients, as they can be blanketed within the fragrance. We avoid all artificial fragrance as they often include highly toxic agents, hormone disruptors, and carcinogens. You will find fragrance in most bath bombs, shampoo, conditions, soaps, shower gels, face cleansers, and more. We achieve beautiful scented household items through using essential oil infused products, or using things that are naturally fragrant, like flowers.

“The fragrances we use in our products are our very own unique creations, so for that reason we don’t provide an ingredient list for them on our website. Anytime you see the word “fragrance” printed in black that indicates that some part of it has a synthetic component. If it is a blend of purely natural or organic oils, it would be written in green.” ~ Email from Lush Customer Care

Sodium Laureth Sulfate

SLS irritates the skin and scalp by stripping away the natural oils that protect it. It does absolutely nothing to benefit your skin or hair, but is used in cosmetics as a detergent and also to make products bubble and foam. It is common in shampoos, shower gels and facial cleansers. SLS are also found in household cleaning products, like dish soap . It is a known human carcinogen, and only exists to make our products foam.... yes, you read that right. We avoid SLS and palm oil in our family in our food and products for it's devastating impact on the environment. (See: healthy homemade palm oil free chocolate lollypops)

With that said, I did see Lush recognizes using SLS is problematic and makes this statement on their website.

"Since 2008, we’ve been trying to remove palm oil from our supply chain due to the devastating impact its cultivation has on the environment. To produce palm oil, tropical forests are razed to make way for palm tree plantations, displacing indigenous people, destroying wildlife and disrupting the delicate ecosystem in the process. However, boycotting palm oil is easier said than done."

Artificial colors

Artificial Colours or dyes are synthetic additives combined to make a single colour. Up to 25 synthetic additives are needed to create one artificial dye. A colour like purple can have up to 50 synthetic chemicals mixed together. Why are we literally bathing in this stuff? Again, this doesn't feel like self care.

"There are some colors that we cannot achieve using only natural pigments, so we use these as a supplement to achieve a full palette of color. Color adds to the aesthetic of a product and enhances the experience."

If you say so, lush...

Why I make perfect floral bath bombs

I still love to take relaxing baths and I still love an aesthetic bath bomb experience. I've made these floral bath bombs dozens of times over the last year, and find this Perfect floral bath bomb recipe works like a charm! Another benefit of making your own is that they are SO much more affordable this way. Spending $6.00-$8.00 on a single bath bomb seems really crazy now that I know how easy they are to make.
 

what you'll gather.

  • baking soda 
  • citric acid 
  • epsom salt
  • cornstarch
  • water
  • dried flowers - we used lavender, calendula, corn flower, rose
  • 10-40 drops of essential oils, if desired (lavender, chamomile + eucalyptus are my favorites for the tub)
  • 2 teaspoon oil carrier oil - like rosehip, coconut, jojoba, or my slow infused dandelion carrier oil

tools.

  • bath bomb mold or mold of choice
  • small spray bottle of water for spritzing if your bath bombs need more liquid while forming
  • optional: recycled egg carton to place bath bombs on while they set

 

Perfect floral bath bomb recipe and why I no longer buy them

Perfect floral bath bomb recipe and why I no longer buy them

Yield: 4 large bath bombs

all natural bath bombs

Ingredients

  • 1 cup baking soda 
  • ½ cup citric acid 
  • ½ cup Epsom salt
  • ½ cup cornstarch
  • ¾ teaspoon water
  • dried flowers - we used lavender, calendula, corn flower, rose
  • 2 teaspoon essential oils, if desired (lavender, chamomile + eucalyptus are my favorites for the tub)
  • 2 teaspoon oil carrier oil - like rose hip, coconut, jojoba, or my slow infused dandelion carrier oil
  • tools.
  • bath bomb mold or mold of choice
  • small spray bottle of water for spritzing if your bath bombs need more liquid while forming
  • optional: a sprinkle of pink Himalayan sea salt.
  • optional: recycled egg carton to place bath bombs on while they set

Instructions

    Step 1: Mix your baking soda and epsom salts and corn starch in a large bowl. Do not add citric acid yet.

    Step 2: Pour all of the liquid ingredients into a small bowl and mix well.

    Step 3: Pour the liquid mixture into the bowl of dry ingredients, and use your hands to combine and meld together. Once mixed, add in your citric acid. It may fizz and react to the liquid (this is normal)

    Step 4: Mash the mixture into your chosen molds very tightly. You may slightly overfill the molds and use a spoon or glass to press the mixture in as tightly as possible. Immediately loosen the bombs from their molds onto wax paper and let them dry overnight. The mixture should be a bit crumbly (similar to the consistency of wet beach sand). Do not pour any water or liquid on them at this point. But, if you find you need more liquid to work with them, spray it on with a spray bottle.

    Step 4: Give the bath bombs a day or two to completely dry before using them or wrapping them up as gifts.

Notes

I always have a few bath bombs on hand for gifting. Making your own is a fabulous way to get creative. You can even hide things (like toys, crystals, or extra flowers) in them for your friends or children!

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment below !

this Perfect floral bath bomb recipe come together in a few minutes with common ingredients we always have. If you haven't made them yet, you'll be pleasantly surprised how well they come together!

If you make them and enjoy them, please be sure to let me know by tagging me at #recipesandrituals on instagram so I can share your beautiful creations!

 

PS. We have a praying mantis that always comes to visit us. I repeatedly place it outside, as my children are afraid of it. But for some reason ... IT LOVES MY BATH BOMBS! It always comes and sits on them. Kind of strange, huh?!

If you're looking for more recipes to use in the shower or tub, check out

Homemade aromatherapy bath + shower melts for sinus relief

Floral bath salts

Rosemary grapefruit sugar scrub

Candied ginger sugar scrub

Coffee and cedar wood sugar scrub

With love,

Sarah