How to make hand rolled rose petal beeswax candles

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How to make hand rolled rose petal beeswax candles

Hand rolled beeswax candles are without a doubt the most simple and satisfying DIY home project that anyone can make in minutes. Beeswax is environmentally friendly and safe. It burns clean, and the wax is natural and biodegradable. Adding dried rose petals adds beauty and depth to this simple craft.

hand rolled rose petal candle

I love making beeswax candles. Beeswaxis actually considered good for the environment by naturally cleaning and purifying the air. It naturally has a nice scent, and as unrefined as they came. It also burns much longer than paraffin or soy! Long-lasting, natural, earth-friendly is my preferred choice. I also had a really difficult time finding a candle that is both made from beeswax and fragrance-free. When I say fragrance, I am referring to artificial fragrance, which is 99% of the time added to candles. Our family does not use artificial fragrance and therefore making our own candles is a great way to avoid the harmful chemicals found in them.

Drying your rose petals from an old bouquet is a beautiful option to give old roses new life. Visit this post on 10 ways to give more life to your wilting roses.

Why make make hand rolled rose petal beeswax candles

The roses are completely for aesthetic. If you've been reading my blog for any period of time, you know I add roses to everything I can. I love love their beauty and ability to make anything extra special.

90% of the candles you find on the market are paraffin. Paraffin wax is cheap, keeping candle costs low to the average consumer. But, as usual, cheap and poor quality may come at a cost to our bodies and our surroundings. First and foremost I want to be very clear, not all paraffin is bad or toxic. Some can even be food grade. However, the process of refining paraffin can be so toxic, you would immediately stop purchasing them if you could only understand how bad they can be to the quality of the air you’re inhaling, potentially polluting in your home.

It is my understanding that a regular candle (one made from paraffin wax) made from a reputable small-batch creator – from within the US would most likely be using good quality paraffin, along with a quality wick in their candles. However, if you’re purchasing from offshore manufactures, it’s very possible they are using crude paraffin to create candles.

These type are toxic may still contains up to 11 toxic compounds and chemicals. Again, to prevent “fear-mongering” and misinformation, paraffin can be very safe. Please don’t boycott your local candle maker who is doing all of the right things. The problem arises when you’re purchasing from a large wholesale distributor and the source of the candle is unknown. How do you know what quality it is? It’s something I would rather avoid. I like to keep things as natural as possible when there’s the possibility to do so. And regardless of who’s making them, paraffin candles should be avoided by those with allergies or asthma.

Why do I avoid soy candles?

Soy is a trendy “healthy” alternative to paraffin candles right now. However, despite being trendy, we would opt to avoid soy candles in our home. Soy is terrible for our environment, due to deforestation to grow soy to feed livestock animals. Growing soy has been known to cause soil erosion and reduce water availability. Soy candles are likely to be made from genetically modified soy crops that are typically sprayed with toxic pesticides. Lastly, to be labeled as a pure soy candle, it only has to be 50% soy. The rest would be paraffin. I would actually prefer to burn a paraffin candle than soy!

Sources:

The Growth of soy and impacts.

Habitat loss in Brazil

Why should I make my own at home?

There are no regulations on disclosing candle ingredients. Candles labeled as “beeswax” may actually contain as little as 5% beeswax. Unless a product is labeled “100% pure beeswax candles”, it would be avoided in these parts.

What about the wick?

Lead was once regularly added to candle wicks to assist in allowing them to stand up straighter and the candle burning better. Obviously, burning lead will lead to health issues if vaporized into the air and inhaled. Fortunately, CPSC Banned Candles With Lead-Cored Wicks in the USA years ago. However, if you’re unsure of the origin of your candle, how do you know for sure? You should definitely look for cotton wicks.

How should I add fragrance to my beeswax candle?

Naturally, of course! After eliminating all artificial fragrance from our home in the last year, I can honestly say I can not stand the smell of “regular” store-bought candles anymore. I decided to try, and on a whim bought a beautiful candle from anthropology (for a mere $100 – sorry Patrick!) that I literally had to give away. I do not add fragrance to my rolled candles, however if you really wanted to you could drop a few drops of essential oil on the wax before you roll it.

What do I need?

I used this kit which had everything I needed to make beeswax candles!

I also used dried rose petals and melted beeswax to paint them on.

The rolled beeswax making kit even had step by step instructions. But here’s how we made them into hand rolled rose petal candles:

Step 1:

Paint on your rose petals to your wax. Take a sheet of honeycomb beeswax and lay it on a flat surface. Melt a tablespoon of beeswax and grab a clean paintbrush. Paint on your rose petals (front and back) and press them down to stick. Be careful as beeswax will be warm after it's melted. I let it cool for a minute or two to prevent burning my fingers. I painted rose petals on ⅓ of the length of the candle, as most of it will be rolled and not visible. Photo for reference.

 

painting rose petals

Step 2:

Cut wick included with kit slightly longer than the length of the beeswax. Place it so some extra wick is hanging out the top of your honeycomb wax sheet.

hand rolled beeswax candles and win

Step 3.

Tightly roll the beeswax around the wic, leaving room at the top to light your wick.

hand rolled rose petal candle

Step 4.

Trim win at the top of candle if needed. Light and enjoy your candle!

rose petal beeswax candle

If you enjoyed painting your rose petals onto your beeswax as much as I do, you may like this homemade rose petal candies recipe.

all tools and ingredients to make hand rolled beeswax candles

How to make hand rolled rose petal beeswax candles

Yield: 1 rolled beeswax candle
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Active Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Estimated Cost: $10

Hand rolled beeswax candles are without a doubt the most simple and satisfying DIY home project that anyone can make in minutes. Beeswax is environmentally friendly and safe. It burns clean, and the wax is natural and biodegradable. Adding dried rose petals adds beauty and depth to this simple craft.

Materials

  • Dried rose petals
  • Cotton wick
  • Beeswax to melt for painting on rose petals
  • Beeswax honey comb sheet
  • Dedicated pot for melting wax
  • Paintbrush

Tools

  • just your hands!

Instructions

  1. Paint on your rose petals to your wax. Take a sheet of beeswax and lay it flat. Melt a tablespoon of beeswax and grab a clean paintbrush. Paint on your rose petals (front and back) and press them down on the honeycomb beswax sheet to stick. Be careful as beeswax will be warm after it’s melted. I painted rose petals on ⅓ of the length of the candle, as most of it will be rolled and not visible.
  2. Cut wick included with kit slightly longer than the length of the beeswax.
  3. Tightly roll the beeswax around the wic, leaving room at the top to light your wick.
  4. Trim wick if needed. Light and enjoy your candle!

Notes

Light candle over a dish or candle holder to prevent wax from ruining surface.

Did you make this project?

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