How to make flower pot beeswax candles with essential oils

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flower pot candles on a wooden crate over a pretty floral cloth

If you've been wanting to try to make all natural, sustainable candles at home - this post on how to make flower pot beeswax candles is perfect for you! Learn why we only use homemade beeswax candles in our home and how simple they are to create!

This easy how to recipe can be used to create a beautiful aesthetic for your own home or as a Mother's Day gift, wedding favor, for your garden loving friends, or as a wonderful, sustainable, nontoxic gift for anyone!

little terracotta teapot floral candles

Why we love candles and haven't completely ditched them:

Pretty, lit candles and their scent inhibit instant feelings of relaxation and create a positive emotional state by creating a calming atmosphere. When I learned about the dangers in artificial fragrance, I knew I had to give up the candles I used to buy from the stores and the mall and start diffusing essential oils. However, I learned that beeswax candles with essential oils are totally safe and healthy. Head this page to learn more about the essential oils we use.

I never considered making beeswax candles in the past as I assumed:

  • it must be impossibly hard since beeswax candles are so hard to come by
  • they wouldn’t burn properly, evenly. Somehow they would be failures, and I’d have wax everywhere for no reason.

However, I was totally wrong, and it was mess-free, took minutes, and the outcome was and beautiful—a true pleasure to burn. I actually probably never need to rebuy another candle; between this brand new candle making skill.

Once you understand how harmful traditional store bought candles can be, paired with how simple and satisfying it is to make your own, you'll never go back!

Reasons to avoid paraffin wax candles

90% of the candles you find on the market are paraffin. Paraffin wax is cheap, keeping candle costs low to the average consumer. But, as usual, cheap and poor quality may come at a cost to our bodies and our surroundings. First and foremost, I want to be veryclear; not all paraffin is bad or toxic. Some can even be food grade. However, the process of refining paraffin can be so toxic; you would immediately stop purchasing them if you could only understand how bad they can be to the quality of the air you’re inhaling, potentially polluting in your home.

It is my understanding that a regular candle (one made from paraffin wax) made from a reputable small-batch creator – from within the US would most likely be using good quality paraffin, along with a quality wick in their candles. However, if you’re purchasing from offshore manufactures, they may be using crude paraffin to create candles. These types are toxic may still contain up to 11 toxic compounds and chemicals.

It's not all bad!

To prevent “fear-mongering” and misinformation, paraffin can be very safe. Please don’t boycott your local candle maker who is doing all of the right things. The problem arises when you’re purchasing from a large wholesale distributor, and the source of the candle is unknown. How do you know what quality it is? It’s something I would rather avoid. I like to keep things as natural as possible when there’s a possibility to do so. And regardless of who’s making them, paraffin candles should be avoided by those with allergies or asthma.

Reasons to avoid soy candles

Soy is a trendy “healthy” alternative to paraffin candles right now. However, despite being trendy, we would opt to avoid soy candles in our home. Soy is terrible for our environment due to deforestation to grow soy to feed livestock animals. Growing soy has been known to cause soil erosion and reduce water availability. Soy candles are likely to be made from genetically modified soy crops typically sprayed with toxic pesticides. Lastly, to be labeled as a pure soy candle, it only has to be 50% soy. The rest would be paraffin. I would actually prefer to burn a paraffin candle than soy!

Sources: The Growth of soy and impacts. Habitat loss in Brazil

Why should you choose beeswax candles?

Beeswax is environmentally friendly and safe. Beeswax burns clean, and the wax is natural and biodegradable. These candles are actually considered good for the environment by naturally cleaning and purifying the air. It naturally has a nice scent and as unrefined as they came. It also burns much longer than paraffin or soy! Long-lasting, natural, earth-friendly is my preferred choice. I also had a challenging time finding a candle that is both made from beeswax and fragrance-free. When I say fragrance, I refer to artificial fragrance, which is 99% of the time added to candles. I used this beeswax.

Why should I make my own candles at home?

There are no regulations on disclosing candle ingredients. Candles labeled as “beeswax” may actually contain as little as 5% beeswax. Unless a product is labeled “100% pure beeswax candles”, it would be avoided in these parts.

How do I find a safe wick?

The lead was once regularly added to candle wicks to help them stand up straighter and the candle burning better. Obviously, burning lead will lead to health issues if vaporized into the air and inhaled. Fortunately, CPSC Banned Candles With Lead-Cored Wicks in the USA years ago. However, if you’re unsure of the origin of your candle, how do you know for sure? You should definitely look for cotton wicks, like these. Or a natural wooden wick, like used in my photos for this recipe.

picture of young living essential oils lined up in rainbow

How should I add my natural fragrance to my candle?

Naturally, of course! After eliminating all artificial fragrances from our home in the last year, I can honestly say I can not stand the smell of “regular” store-bought candles anymore. On a whim, I decided to try to buy a beautiful candle from anthropology (for a mere $100 – sorry, Patrick!) that I literally had to give away. I would recommend quality essential oils (1 ml for every 1 oz) if you want many scents to emit from your candle. In this candle, I used a combination of oils to create a pleasing floral scent. I recommend putting together your oils I na small doppler bottle first so you're certain you're happy with the result before pouring the oils directly into your beeswax.

For this particular recipe I used equal parts: Copiaba, ylang ylang, geranium, lavender, peppermint, lemon and northern lights black spruce. It's beautiful, floral and balanced.

What do I need to make flower pot beeswax candles?

What you’ll need to make your own candles are:

  1. Beeswax pellets
  2. Wick of choice
  3. Double boiler or pour pot dedicated to melting beeswax
  4. Essential oils
  5. Mini terracotta pots with lid like this one

OPTIONAL:

Dried or pressed flowers.

Normally, we press our own flowers. But if you are crunched for time and want to make these a gift, you can use these.

How to make flower pot beeswax candles

ingredients for beeswax flower pot candles

Start with your ingredients and tools.

You'll need:

Mini terracotta flower pots. If your flower pot has a drainage hole, you'll want to be sure to seal it with your wick, and to be safe you may want to light it with it's lid underneath to prevent wax from leaking when your candle is lit. I purchased the ones pictured from a local terracotta shop here in Tunisia Africa, however they are widely available in most places.

Beeswax pellets. The amount will depend on how large your pots are. I am using 2" pots. I used one and a half cup of beeswax pellets.

Wicks. I recommend organic cotton wicks for beeswax in most cases. In this recipe I am using a natural wooden wick and it burns fantastic.

Essential oils. I recommend a pretty floral blend to enhance the floral pots.

Optional: Dried or pressed flowers for aesthetic. I used both (naturally) 🙂

Once you've gathered your ingredients, prepare your terracotta pots by securing the wick.

Note: if your flower pot has a draining hole, be sure your wick is fully covering it so prevent your wax from leaking out.

flowers and beeswax melting in a pour pot for candle making

Next you'll melt your beeswax in a double boiler or candle pour pot.

I recommend having one dedicated just for wax as they are difficult to clean. To clean the pot you want to add water and boil until wax loosens, otherwise it will be very challenging to remove residue. Beeswax is biodegradable.

overhead shot of mini terracotta flower pot candles just poured

Once your beeswax is melted, let it cool for a minute or two. Then add in your essential oils and mix well with a dedicated spoon or compostable wooden spoon (once beeswax hardens it's very difficult to clean). Now you can pour it into your pots. Leave some wick exposed for proper lighting / burning. Don't wait too long to mix your oils and pour as beeswax hardens really quickly.

candles in mini terracotta floral pots hardening

Now you just let your beeswax harden at room temperature (about 20-30 minutes) and they're done! It's really that simple!

freshly poured beeswax candle lit

Other candle recipes you may love:

Pressed flower beeswax candle

Rolled honeycomb beeswax candle

Rose petal rolled candle

Now on to the How to make flower pot beeswax candles

flower pot candles on a wooden crate over a pretty floral cloth

How to make flower pot beeswax candles

Yield: 6 mini candles
Prep Time: 2 minutes
Active Time: 10 minutes
Additional Time: 30 minutes 20 seconds
Total Time: 42 minutes 20 seconds
Difficulty: Easy
Estimated Cost: $20

This easy how to recipe can be used to create a beautiful aesthetic for your own home or as a Mother's Day gift, wedding favor, for your garden loving friends, or as a wonderful, sustainable, nontoxic gift for anyone!

Materials

  • 1 ½ cups Beeswax pellets
  • 6 Wicks of choice
  • Essential oils of choice

Tools

  • Double boiler or pour pot dedicated to melting beeswax
  • 6 Mini terracotta pots with lid like this one

Instructions

    Once you've gathered your ingredients, prepare your terracotta pots by securing the wick. Note: if your flower pot has a draining hole, be sure your wick is fully covering it so prevent your wax from leaking out.

    Melt your beeswax in a double boiler or candle pour pot.

    Once your beeswax is melted, let it cool for a minute or two. Then add in your essential oils and mix well with a dedicated spoon or compostable wooden spoon (once beeswax hardens it's very difficult to clean). Now you can pour it into your pots. Leave some wick exposed for proper lighting / burning. Don't wait too long to mix your oils and pour as beeswax hardens really quickly.

    Now you just let your beeswax harden at room temperature (about 20-30 minutes) and they're done

Did you make this project?

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